Jehova’s Witnesses Don’t Believe Jesus Christ Is The Son Of God

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This is my side of the story after two Jehovah’s Witnesses came to my door and told me about their strange and in my view, wrongheaded sect of Christianity.

For more videos, check out my channel.

Related Video: Student At Moody Bible Institute Explains Why Most Christians Don’t Believe In Healing

 

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Jehova’s Witnesses Don’t Believe Jesus Christ Is The Son Of God was last modified: October 28th, 2014 by Rob Rennie
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  • Matt L

    Hello, followed your link from ROK. I was raised as a JW, so I listened to this. I haven’t been a Witness for years and don’t agree with many of their teachings. However, I do take issue with some of your criticisms. I, too, am a political conservative. But abstaining to vote and remaining politically neutral are not necessarily out of line with Scripture. And they believe Jesus is both the Son of God and Michael the Archangel. This is a stretch, but not out of the realm of possibility. They do not believe in the Trinity. They do believe in the power of the Holy Spirit to give Christians strength and to guide and direct them in spiritual matters but they believe miracles (speaking in tongues) ceased after the Apostolic Age. I just find it ironic that you sound exactly like them by saying you profess the ‘truth’ and they aren’t true Christians. They’d say the same about you! Everyone thinks their interpretation is right. Personally, I think many of their beliefs are ridiculous, but just by briefly perusing your site I can tell many of your beliefs are silly as well. You’re parroting what you’ve been taught, which seems to me to be a very narrow view of Christianity and the Scriptures. Same with them. Before dismissing alternative views as heretical, research the historical origins of different views and why some were adopted by the Roman Catholic Church (and subsequently the Reformers) and others rejected. I applaud your zeal, however I’d advise you to restrain from rebuking other views until you understand them.

    • eternalplanner

      Hey Matt, appreciate your thoughts. I know religious debate often becomes murky when two different people use the same scripture to justify their beliefs, but I want you to realize I did end up having a follow-up conversation with these two particular Jehovah’s Witnesses. I spent a total of 3 or 4 hours talking to them between their two visits. I made a video on it you can check out here – http://www.eternalplanner.com/showdown-jehovas-witnesses-jesus-christ-continued/

      Also, I wanted to clear something else up. When you say I’m parroting what I’ve been taught, it makes me think you haven’t read anything on this site. I was never taught about speaking in tongues, deliverance, the guidance of the Holy Spirit, none of it. I was your typical Sunday Christian who went out and got drunk and tried to get laid the rest of the week. I wasn’t ‘taught’ any of this. The word I would use is ‘shown.’ I was shown this by the Holy Spirit after having a supernatural encounter with Jesus that changed my life. I don’t know if you got a chance to read my personal testimony, but I urge you to check it out if you haven’t – eternalplanner.com/robstestimony

      When Jehovah’s Witnesses say they don’t believe in tongues or deliverance, they’re giving me a theological interpretation of scripture (and one that I disagree with, obviously), but the point is, it’s a view that is not based on their experiences. If they had experienced what I experienced, they wouldn’t be giving me their textbook answers.

      But Matt, here’s the real kicker. In a search to find the truth and interviewing over 100 random Christians (and counting) who were former drug addicts, witches, fortune tellers, prostitutes, etc what I’ve found is that in every one of these cases, they went through identical experiences (tongues, deliverance, rebuking in Jesus’ name etc.) Basically, they went through not just similar supernatural experiences – they were ‘identical.’

      So you can quote scripture all day, but if you haven’t lived it, then it’s worth nothing and that’s the case with not just Jehovah’s Witnesses, but with Catholics, Mormons, Methodists and other denomination who exalt church doctrine over what the Holy Spirit shows us through real-life experiences.

      It’s not about being a Jehovah’s Witnesses, Catholic, Methodist, Episcopalian etc. It’s about being a real follower of Jesus (doer not hearer) and following after Him for real, not playing church. I urge you to listen to some of the testimonies on this site.

      God bless,

      Rob

      • Matt L

        Hi Rob. Sound reasoning, and I agree for the most part. The counter point would be that if your ‘experiences’ aren’t in harmony with Scriptural teaching, the origin of those experiences comes into question. Also, just because someone doesn’t experience the Holy Spirit working within them exactly like the next person, it doesn’t invalidate their experience. There a literally thousands (if not millions) of “former drug addicts, witches, fortune tellers, prostitutes, etc” who have reformed their lives’ after embracing Christ that haven’t experienced speaking in tongues or ‘deliverance’ (as you see it). When I said that it seems you’re parroting what you’ve been taught, I meant that you seem to be buying in to “Deliverance Ministry” hook, line, and sinker, similar to those who embrace “Prosperity Theology” or any other recent movement. I found this account to be very enlightening when to comes to DM. http://cicministry.org/commentary/issue78.htm I’d like to know your thoughts, since you have much more experience with it than I do. I did read your Testimony. Powerful stuff.

        • Matt L

          I just watched your second video. I disagree with many JW teachings and I’d turn the typical JW into a pretzel if they came to my door. This is because I know and understand all of their teachings, being that I was raised as one. That said, I’d caution you about making anymore public declarations about their faith until you do more research and have a better understanding of their positions. Most JW’s themselves don’t even have a thorough understanding of their organization’s history or the origins of their beliefs. They think that the JW founders came up with their doctrines, when in reality only a few of their teachings are original or unique to them. An example of this is ‘conditionalism’. Martin Luther himself advocated this, and the JW’s adopted it. One thing that annoys me about JW’s is that their scope of knowledge doesn’t go beyond their own theology. If you’re going to teach others your beliefs or question theirs, you should have at least a working knowledge of the major theological doctrines, their origins, and their arguments for and against. More importantly, as Christians we owe it to ourselves to continue to learn. Trust me, my beliefs have grown and evolved over the years with in-depth study and prayer. If you objectively and humbly study the Bible as a seeker of truth, you just may come to the conclusion that mainstream Christianity and every denomination in existence have one only thing in common – they’re all wrong.

          • eternalplanner

            Hey Matt, you made me look up ‘conditionalism.’ According to wikipedia, it means salvation is contingent upon belief in Jesus and that nonbelievers will go to hell. If that’s what conditionalism means, then I guess I’m a conditionalist. I agree with your point about being well-versed in the different theological arguments and views and that’s something I continue to work on, but keep in mind I’ve never gone to seminary and most likely never will. I feel strongly that a theological degree isn’t necessary in order to share one’s faith, or testimony. That’s kind of what this site is all about. It’s about being led by the Holy Spirit and letting Him teach us first and foremost (testing the spirits of course).

  • Shortcake

    In your YouTube clip, your objection to Jehovah’s Witnesses not getting involved with politics not being “Christian” does not make sense to me, since the Bible says Jesus ran away when the people of his day wanted him to become involved in politics, wanted him to be King. Jehovah’s Witnesses share Jesus’ position that their Kingdom (or government) is no part of this current world. Why would it be wrong to run away from any involvement with this world’s politics, if it was okay for Jesus to do so?

    Perhaps it might help you to understand our reasoning if you think of Jehovah’s Witnesses like “ambassadors” for that Kingdom government with Jesus as their King… As you know, ambassadors may reside in lands ruled by other governments, but they do not take part in the political process of those governments, as they belong to a DIFFERENT government and work for it.

    Another reason not to get involved with worldly politics is that the Bible makes clear that Satan is the ruler of this world. (Otherwise, how could he had tempted Jesus with all the kingdoms (governments) of this world? Also, when Daniel was praying, remember that an angel told him that he was delayed by a demonic angel from an Earthly government, who tried to stop him.) Rather than work from the top of this world’s governments down to accomplish good, Jehovah’s Witnesses prefer to copy how Christ Jesus trained his disciples to instead make a grass-roots effort to change things individual by individual, family by family, reaching the HEART.

    Also, please keep in mind that our ministry is world-wide. If we got involved with the politics of one particular country, wouldn’t that make it harder for us to reach the hearts of people in a different country? Or immigrants within a country? Or Republicans vs. Democrats if we were to take sides? Why foster such political resentment when it is their SPIRITUAL well-being we should be concerned with, not the politics of whatever country we are preaching and teaching in.

    Why polish the brass on the Titanic? Daniel 2:44 clearly foretells that Satan’s world is going to be replaced by God’s Kingdom government, on a world-wide scale.

    With all of the above in mind, I feel it is more Christian to follow the way Christ accomplished good, by avoiding politics and directly helping the people. Sure, it might not get you the most media attention, but it is Christ’s example we should follow, not what is popular. Politics has become like a religion to more and more people, in rivalry to true worship of God. Psalm 146:3 is one example of how the Bible tries to warn us not to put our trust in such things.

    This being said, the doing of good and the helping of the poor and those in need are being done by Jehovah’s Witnesses. We are often among the very first to bring relief during a disaster and have an active ministry work in prisons and we help people family-by-family where we see a true need. But, it’s never under compulsion and the SPIRITUAL help takes priority over the physical. If that way was good enough for Jesus, I feel that’s how it should be, with the spiritual teaching taking priority. Giving people HOPE for the future is certainly what the GOOD NEWS of God’s Kingdom that Jesus preached was all about! It had nothing to do with politics, which is so often a nasty, cut-throat business.

  • Shortcake

    All you have to do to prove that you are incorrect and that Jehovah’s Witnesses DO believe that Jesus is indeed the Son of God is to read chapter 3 “Who is Jesus?” of their Bible Course book, “What Does The Bible Really Teach?” and you will see that they certainly do believe Jesus is the Son of God. (You can download the book free on JW.org) I want to give you the benefit of the doubt as to why you would air such a falsehood, and am assume that perhaps you were so thrown by hearing another title for Jesus used (Arch Angel) that you jumped to the wrong conclusion about their other beliefs? If so, an apology is in order and that You Tube clip should either be corrected or removed, please. Thank you.